New Line type - Gliss

Kdog

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Another site I am on has a thread started on a new line called Gliss which according to the marketing claims is the gratest thing going........

Anyhow
"Gliss Supersmooth Monotex Line is a revolutionary new line in a class of its own. It delivers the many of the same properties as mono in that it features a single strand construction, is super pliable, casts very well, and it floats, yet it still has many of the advantages of braid as well, including zero stretch, extremely thin diameters, and incredible strength."

Line Diameter 8lb 12lb 18lb 24lb 40lb
Inches .004 .005 .006 .007 .010
Millimeters .102 .127 .152 .178 .254

They claim it is a lot less costly than braid and my comparison show its about 25% less

Gliss 300yds = $28
Suffix 832 300yds = $35

I'm following the thread on the other site but historically, there is a lot of negative info and too much "Bull O' the woods mentality" to get a reliable accurate read. So has anyone tried this "4th generation line" and if so what do you think?

My style of fishing almost demands a zero stretch line and sensitivity is the name of the game. So the thinner diameter is very attractive and even though I am a big fan of 832 braid a 30% reduction in line diameter is appealing.
 

hookup

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Floats? Why? Only makes you have to add more weight to get the line down.

What's monotex? Mono? Braid?

$28 for 300 yards is not cheap.

The diameter's are nice - 6# mono's usually .010". FYI - no consistency or standards with breaking strenght. I tend to look at line diameter and trust it more.

I'll probably try it because I'm a sucker for new hype.

I typically use either Tectan or Mean Green when opting for mono and Suffix 832 when fishing braid.
 

ACAMS

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hookup said:
Floats? Why? Only makes you have to add more weight to get the line down.

I have two rods I use every crappie trip

1- I spool with Fluorocarbon because it sinks and I use it for casting jigs with no float.

2- I spool with Berkly XL mono because it floats (kinda) I use with a float.
If I use Fluorocarbon and a float the damn line sinks and messes everything up!


I will try it for sure!
 

Hawnjigs

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Kdog, thanks for posting. As an "if it ain't broke..." kinda guy I don't pay much attention to new product hype but researching what little review info is available online Gliss sounds promising. Actually, since switching to braid I was wondering why a single strand PE hadn't been developed.

One review discovery was poor hard abrasion break strength which makes it unsuitable for hard rock apps, currently 100% of my time. Maybe in the future tech advances will address that issue.

Also, Gliss's single strand extrusion process might bring the price down to mono levels eventually. I can wait.
 

Kdog

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Hawnjigs,
I agree not much empirical data and the reviews are very sparse. They are touting it as a braid substitute but when its 20 degrees outside, I gotta trust my equipment. The 832 suffix has to date been the best thing. But I am always will to look at something new. I am almost exclusively fluorocarbon or braid depending on type of fishing. My Fluoro choice is Tatsu followed by Pline's Halo but braid and and I've tried them all is hands down suffix 832.

Braid is always tipped with a Fluoro leader.

I did not find the hard rock issue and most adds although mostly tackle companies say outstanding abrasion resistance but those are salespeople. I am looking for real life use and experience.
 

Hawnjigs

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This guy on bassresource.com did some homework:

"I gave it a decent test last night for abrasion resistance. I held the line taut and rubbed it against a few different materials. I ran it both horizontally WITH the grain of the line, and perpendicular to the line....in order to simulate as many real-life scenarios we might encounter.

Wood - unless you REALLY ran it over the wood, over and over again, in a rough spot, it did very well. It took about 5 minutes of really rubbing against the grain to get enough of a fray to break the line. Used a tree branch for this.

Sandpaper (simulate bass teeth) - it didn't take as long as the wood, but did well here. I could see that after maybe 10 fish or so you might want to re-tie, but you should be checking anyways after every couple fish

"Average" piece of limestone - surprisingly it took a decent amount of abrading to break the line, I would estimate about the same time as it took for the sandpaper. If you're fishing rock beds, rip rap, or river, you'd probably be checking your line anyways. This was your normal large-ish size of decorative landscape piece of limestone/granite.

Coarse rock - the line broke almost immediately, but only after considerable pressure. If the line wasn't taut, it just kind of moved around, but tighten the line, and BAM, it broke quickly, every time I tried it. I could see this being a problem if you're fishing submerged pilings or sharp edged items under the surface. I used the corner edge of a cinder block to simulate coarse rock."
 
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