mop jiggin' variations

jiggerjohn

Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2010
Messages
487
During this season so far, I've discovered how to totally" mop up" trout ,crappies, largemouth and smallmouth bass, and even carp and catfish ! Yep, I studied the trout fly fishers use of 1" mop nubs from auto cleaning mitts, which has been so productive for them as bright ,fat little grub imitators. Then, lured on by spirited you tube videos by a fellow with the handle "crappie hippie", I saw the value of expanding the fly tier's art to our warmwater jig species. Once on to this inexpensive, glowing chartreuse or flo orange material ,my catch rate of rainbow trout and crappies went through the roof, with continuation into early summer for Lake Erie largemouth & smallmouth bass, panfish, sheepshead, and channel cats. Lately, large local carp have become HUGE fans !
Of course, it's extremely easy to simply lash a single mop nub below the neck of a small jig in the 1/32 to 1/16 oz size,using those nifty leadfree roundheads, with no 8 O'Shaughnessy hooks from our own Hawnjigs! This is actually the only tie needed, tho I sometimes spiral on a wool or dog hair collar to cover the wraps. Fished alone, with tiny rod twitches while slowly sinking, the soft ,sensitive microfiber moplet fidgets enticingly, sometimes wobbling side-to-side, or jukes up and down. It's caught around 15 species so far, 16 if you include the irate snapping turtle that grabbed on the other morning!
As famed Nebraskan jig fishing Ace, Keith Okimoto constantly chastises me, though, I'm never satisfied to let well enough alone ! I started wondering if the mop action swinging so loosely and attractively below could possibly mimic a very colorful "underspin" effect ,minus a weed catching metal blade. SO I placed a small paddletail straight out from the very rear of the hook on my mop jigs, and found this extra swim and vibration, actually creating a double action, was sheer dynamite on bass and crappies! (any slim soft plastic will work as this backside tipping, and will greatly benefit from a brilliant chartreuse, actionized belly). Then remembering how small double tail, crab like jigs always produced, I started tying a twin mop tail, each leg splayed out to the side, just at hook bend, and spiraled some material up front to cover the hook shank ; fished on a twitching drop with UL gear, hard fished pond bass and panfish went nuts! Oh, and my carp? Since the jig is essentially a MOP, I soaked my one inch jig in corn juice, tipped with a corn kernal, and let the slow descending wobble catch their eye ,let it rest on bottom for a few seconds, reel a bit more & drop again, etc. They grabbed on to this aromatic little morsei, held on to the soft tasty offering, then TOOK OFF to long battle !!
Oh, I'll still continue to play with new variations, but this may be the only jig I'll ever tie again for most freshwater fishing!! Get yourself a light jighead, a mop nub, and a length of tying thread, then you'll "mop up", too!
 

jiggerjohn

Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2010
Messages
487
eddieb, I just go to ebay, under "auto cleaning mitts". Lots of colors, tho I'm a big fan of chartreuse mop nubs for most of my ties.
 

jiggerjohn

Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2010
Messages
487
Here's a recent update and discovery on the double tailed mop jig >>

I ventured out to our local ,hard fished Pine Pond,late morning on a cloudy day, hoping to have a better chance at bass and big 'gills. BUT very dismayed to see the lake very calm and still, and totally covered with that awful slimey green algae. Unlike a previous time out there, there wasn't even a thin open water lane near the dam to dip my double tailed mop. Even any weedless jig wouldn't have helped in this slop! Casting anywhere was an invitation to pull in a lot of greengunk wrapped around my jig. So, standing on the dam with that thin carpet a mere foot below, I was fairly frustrated, but determined to figger out the puzzle. It came to me that if i raised my jig above the surface ,then quickly plopped it down, that I could penetrate the thin green layer without gunking up (too much). Or firing a hard cast straight down and thru. The fast dipping worked best, and I got the clean mop jig in clear water beneath, SOME of the time! Of course, EVERY time I pulled my jig out again,keeping a short line-maybe 5' , I'd haul in a heap of moss!

SOOO, I left the little jig underneath,in what reminded me of a massive flat of green cheese, then slowly jiggled up and down, moving it around - had me recalling those thin wire cheese slicers that we used as kids to cut down chunks of velveeta cheese blocks! As I walked down the dam, the line was taut with a 1/16 oz jighead giving me fairly good tension, and straight tight line as it carved right thru the algae -did look like the wire of our old time cheese cutters! But every now and then my rod tip would shoot down- strikes were very hard- and I'd have me another largemouth, big crappie, or vicious bluegill ! Not tremendously fast action, but one of my better bass days in summer out there! And amazingly exciting, cause ya never knew when that big strike would come! Half the time,in fact, I wasn't sure if the jig HAD submerged weed-free ,but on the short line, this was easy to check (tho when it did break the surface, I would then tangle into a load of crap -that part was very frustrating,I think I still have algae on my finger tips from constant removals!)

Crazy thing was, the fish only seemed interested in the "mop-Claw" that I tied with one chartreuse leg and the other in purple ! Maybe the contrast offered them something they could see easier., or else they thought a Martian invasion was on (maybe that is not too far out of a concept -the little town of Mars,PA is just over the hill!!!), Anyway, I'll certainly be playing with two tone tails on my mopjigs fer a while. The fish sure seem interested in the simultaneous subtley twitching 2 legs, or maybe it offers twice the vibration to call em in?!
 

EasyKasting

New member
Joined
Sep 6, 2019
Messages
5
Here's a recent update and discovery on the double tailed mop jig >>

I ventured out to our local ,hard fished Pine Pond,late morning on a cloudy day, hoping to have a better chance at bass and big 'gills. BUT very dismayed to see the lake very calm and still, and totally covered with that awful slimey green algae. Unlike a previous time out there, there wasn't even a thin open water lane near the dam to dip my double tailed mop. Even any weedless jig wouldn't have helped in this slop! Casting anywhere was an invitation to pull in a lot of greengunk wrapped around my jig. So, standing on the dam with that thin carpet a mere foot below, I was fairly frustrated, but determined to figger out the puzzle. It came to me that if i raised my jig above the surface ,then quickly plopped it down, that I could penetrate the thin green layer without gunking up (too much). Or firing a hard cast straight down and thru. The fast dipping worked best, and I got the clean mop jig in clear water beneath, SOME of the time! Of course, EVERY time I pulled my jig out again,keeping a short line-maybe 5' , I'd haul in a heap of moss!

SOOO, I left the little jig underneath,in what reminded me of a massive flat of green cheese, then slowly jiggled up and down, moving it around - had me recalling those thin wire cheese slicers that we used as kids to cut down chunks of velveeta cheese blocks! As I walked down the dam, the line was taut with a 1/16 oz jighead giving me fairly good tension, and straight tight line as it carved right thru the algae -did look like the wire of our old time cheese cutters! But every now and then my rod tip would shoot down- strikes were very hard- and I'd have me another largemouth, big crappie, or vicious bluegill ! Not tremendously fast action, but one of my better bass days in summer out there! And amazingly exciting, cause ya never knew when that big strike would come! Half the time,in fact, I wasn't sure if the jig HAD submerged weed-free ,but on the short line, this was easy to check (tho when it did break the surface, I would then tangle into a load of crap -that part was very frustrating,I think I still have algae on my finger tips from constant removals!)

Crazy thing was, the fish only seemed interested in the "mop-Claw" that I tied with one chartreuse leg and the other in purple ! Maybe the contrast offered them something they could see easier., or else they thought a Martian invasion was on (maybe that is not too far out of a concept -the little town of Mars,PA is just over the hill!!!), Anyway, I'll certainly be playing with two tone tails on my mopjigs fer a while. The fish sure seem interested in the simultaneous subtley twitching 2 legs, or maybe it offers twice the vibration to call em in?!
It looks like you're on to something! Thanks for splitting the text up; it makes it easier to read.
Thanks for sharing!
 

jiggerjohn

Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2010
Messages
487
EK, thanks for your comments and interest. Below is another version of double mop tie that has been really effective on crappie,bass, and bluegill!The single mop tie on the right (with small golden retreiver collar) has proven devastating on very wary local carp (of nice size and power!) when soaked in corn juice (a mop jig really "sponges up" the juice for terrific smell!) and tipped with a kernal of corn!

1628084244344.png
 

jiggerjohn

Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2010
Messages
487
Forgive my over-enthusiasm (again!), but had another good weekend(8/7) with a mop variation that I just have to share!!

Now about that fishing! For once the weather, wind, and current were all tame over in Western Ohio ! But always something - they were busy dredging the upper ends of BOTH the river mouths that I like to work from piers, right as these productive waters enter Lake Erie ! So lots of noise, some added current, and silty water. Don't know if it totally spooked the fish,tho, as every session I got largemouth, white bass, white perch, and sheepshead (missed some big stuff!) on the little mop belly and Brewer swim tail combo on a 1/16 oz jig! Son Rob even saw a guy land a small muskie as he walked out to see me on the V pier one morning - I may need to attach longer plastics to my mop-based jigs!! Maybe all those big barges and their pounding (adding new stone to the adjacent pier on the other side of the channel) and the dredging at the breakwall are scattering the fish from deeper water into the pier area and down the river ? Yeah, I still had to work for them, but very enjoyable weather to do so ! One evening I could casually walk the pier and pick up bass as I went, then the next,just before a sudden Lake Erie rain storm engulfed me (picture a drowned rat with a wet smile on his face!!), I found one small pocket, where one thick bodied sheepshead after another BLASTED my chartreuse necked paddle-tail ! Man, was it great to have the parabolic bending power of a new (but old fashioned,anniversary model) Charley Brewer original fiberglass 4'9" rod -gave a lot more playing control than typical UL outfits!Them Erie drum iz fierce!



I did find that the fan tail plastic along with the swishing mop strip underneath was totally the key to success last weekend. It had some LOCAL pier jockeys talking to themselves -of course they didn't have mops !! But I tested the plastic tail without the mop belly at times, and would get no strikes. Sometimes I'd get an immediate hit with a new jig on , and discover since I didn't hook the fish, that ONLY the moplet was gone or shredded ! The cool thing was, in "skidding" it across bottom rocks, the protection of the mop underneath the hook shank, seemed to yield an extra layer of snaglessness -very important around the rock laden pier areas! And, as usual, the subtle rod shaking on my part supplied a nifty under-wag of the mop and created a unique style of roll to the total lure,which musta triggered a lot of strikes with that sorta "death thro" of the artificial bright bellied critter ! At any rate, that trip sure offered tremendous incentive to keep on rock moppin' in other areas, to see what miracles can come!
 
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