Post Reply 
 
Thread Rating:
  • 1 Votes - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Bead & Pin Jigs
12-18-2010, 01:56 PM
Post: #1
Bead & Pin Jigs
[Image: IMG_0304_edited.jpg]
Another alternative to traditional lead head jigs are 'bead and pin' jigs.

[Image: 280.jpg]
Bead and pin jigs are created by inserting a pin or very small nail through a solid metal bead,

[Image: 281.jpg]
and then tying the pin to the jig hook.

I first heard of bead and pin jigs being used as steelhead jigs by Canadian float-fishermen. While float fishing with jigs for steelhead, you allready have weight in the form of split shots on your leader, and you are dead-drifting your presentation with the current (not actually jigging), so a heavy lead-headed jig is unnecessary. Actually a light-weight jig is preferable for float-fishing, as the lighter jig will flutter and move about more in the current.

I began tying up bead and pin jigs because I was unhappy with the pre-poured lead head jigs I was finding. I find that most pre-poured lead head jigs are generally too heavy if they have a size 8 or larger hook, have too small of hooks if they are lighter than 1/64 oz, and pretty much all have weak and dull lite wire hooks. Since steelhead have rather boney mouths and are hard fighting fish, I prefer a strong and super sharp hook for my jigs.
[Image: 276.jpg]
I now tie most of my steelhead jigs on #4 or #6 Daiichi jig hooks or the higher end Mustads in size 8. I generally use 1/2" pins and solid hemmatite beads that I find at my local crafts store. The hemmatite beads are very light weight and inexpensive. I sometimes use solid brass beads which provide more weight but are also more expensive. Using the bead and pin method I can create a jig weighing less than 1/80 oz yet tied on a sharp and strong #4 hook...perfect jig for my float fishing applications.
[Image: 174.jpg]

John
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
12-18-2010, 02:30 PM
Post: #2
RE: Bead & Pin Jigs
Great pics and explanations! Makes perfect sense for lighter weight heads. How securely does the thread wrap hold the pin?

Does the flash of the bead ever alarm spooky fish?

Why do you prefer Daiichis to Ultra Point 32833 in #4 & #6? Daiichi samples I got years ago were too soft for my liking - maybe a bad batch.

I find tin metal a lighter weight alternative to lead for poured heads.

I'll bet AtticaFish is planning a craft store visit...
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
12-18-2010, 03:26 PM
Post: #3
RE: Bead & Pin Jigs
Excellent idea for the large profile light jigs. Excellent tyes as well - thnx for sharing
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
12-18-2010, 04:32 PM
Post: #4
RE: Bead & Pin Jigs
I really like this idea. Nice ties and great presentation. Cool

I think that a "Bead & Pin Schlappen" tie will have a bit of a ring to it. Wink

Pup's Jig Works
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
12-18-2010, 05:25 PM
Post: #5
RE: Bead & Pin Jigs
(12-18-2010 02:30 PM)Hawnjigs Wrote:  Great pics and explanations! Makes perfect sense for lighter weight heads. How securely does the thread wrap hold the pin?
Very secure! I've never had one come apart. I almost allways use 6/0 tying thread, first lay down an even thread base, then tie on the pin with VERY TIGHT even wraps. If worried about strength you could apply super glue or head cement to the wraps before going on with the tie, but honestly I have never seen a real need to do so.

(12-18-2010 02:30 PM)Hawnjigs Wrote:  Does the flash of the bead ever alarm spooky fish?
A high shine brass or nickel bead may have fish attracting properties at times, but may spook high pressured fish in low clear water. The hemmatite beads that I most often use are a gun metal gray color with a little less shine to them. Of course the bead and pin could be painted before being tied in.

(12-18-2010 02:30 PM)Hawnjigs Wrote:  Why do you prefer Daiichis to Ultra Point 32833 in #4 & #6? Daiichi samples I got years ago were too soft for my liking - maybe a bad batch.
Not really that I prefer Daiichis, but more so that I still have them to use up. My local tackle shop got me turned on to the Mustad Ultra Points when I was looking for Daiichis in size 8. I still think the Daiichi 4660's are great hooks, but the Ultra Points are even better. Once I use up the Daiichis I will be restocking with the Ultra Points.

(12-18-2010 02:30 PM)Hawnjigs Wrote:  I find tin metal a lighter weight alternative to lead for poured heads.
That would also be a great alternative. Plus far less toxic than lead.

(12-18-2010 02:30 PM)Hawnjigs Wrote:  I'll bet AtticaFish is planning a craft store visit...
Big Grin

John
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
12-18-2010, 08:22 PM
Post: #6
RE: Bead & Pin Jigs
really a nice tutorial. Thanks
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
12-19-2010, 12:38 AM
Post: #7
RE: Bead & Pin Jigs
Crazy, crazy, crazy!!! - I have been looking at the newer lindy ice fishing jigs that have the weight out in front of the hook eye to make them 'swim' outside of vertical. I was playing around with crimping a splitshot on a piece of spinnerbait wire and then 'wrapping' it with thread to the shank of a jig hook on friday at work! This looks soooooo much more simple. Sorry to go off of your intention of the overall design, but Hawn is correct as well!!!!! I will be making a stop at my craft store first of the week. Cool You have me pegged hawn. I have a box of finish nails that should serve the purpose. To go heavier as well, i think the tungsten bomb beads might work. Too many options........ Cool Thanks for posting! Smile

JigCraft.com : Co-Founder
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
12-19-2010, 11:05 AM
Post: #8
RE: Bead & Pin Jigs
John... your a genius.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
12-19-2010, 12:00 PM
Post: #9
RE: Bead & Pin Jigs
(12-19-2010 11:05 AM)jjsjigs Wrote:  John... your a genius.

Hahahaha....I'm just passing on a technique that I first saw being done years ago. I can't take any credit as being the originator of this type of jig making.

To me the best thing about this style of jig making is that it gives you greater freedom to create your jig head to the specs you prefer. You are not limited to what size or type of hook fits within a particular mold. I've been thinking about tying up some crawfish patterns with this style of jig. That way I could tye the pattern on perhaps a 2/0 bass jig hook, yet still keep it light enough to cast with a flyrod.

Thanks everyone! Hope you have fun experimenting with this different technique.

John
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
12-19-2010, 12:39 PM
Post: #10
RE: Bead & Pin Jigs
Neat, thanks for sharing.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread: Author Replies: Views: Last Post
  Naming your jigs Kdog 11 172 09-25-2014 08:17 AM
Last Post: StumpHunter
  Pork Frog jigs Muskygary 4 92 09-12-2014 03:10 PM
Last Post: Muskygary
  Looking for Suggestions for Jigs for Yellowstone Trout shredmandan 10 258 07-16-2014 03:01 PM
Last Post: deathb4disco
  Anyone pour moon glow jigs? Barefoot 3 167 06-17-2014 09:45 PM
Last Post: Barefoot
  Large shad jigs dblevens 11 398 03-20-2014 09:51 PM
Last Post: toadfrog



User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)